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Destroy cluster without CVM access

  • 9 December 2019
  • 6 replies
  • 2595 views

Hello community,

does anyone have advice on destroying cluster without CVM access? As you know, JAVA applet doesn’t allow you to reinitialize system because of existing cluster config. And, I don’t have access to CVM or Prism.

 

Thank you,

Dragan

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Best answer by sbarab 9 December 2019, 23:42

 @Dragan  Assuming you no more care about existing cluster data, you can:

 

1- I have not tried this, but since you have access to the AHV, you should be able to run:

virsh list-all (to get the cvm name and it should show the cvm is not running)

If the cvm does run, try:

visrsh destroy <cvm-name>  (this should stop it)

and finally

virsh undefine <cvm name>

This should remove the configuration file on that node, You should try this on all nodes

2- If the above does not work, for what you need,  run phoenix iso built for your desired AOS, from ipmi and either repair CVM or reinstall CVM (if your intention is to make use of these for another cluster). If that is not your intention, you can use general phoenix iso from your portal and get the disks using the “lssci” command and wipe out the partition tables on each disks using: “dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdX bs=1M count=2048", this  destroys the first 2G of the disk and the partition table will gone.

 

Having said the above, you can actually switch the cvm password to default, using the same phoenix iso as above but mounting the boot drive of the cvm on phoenix shell and modifying the password back to the default value. But this is a very involved process and I suggest you to open a case with support to do so..

 

 

Hope this helps a little;

 

Regards,

 

-Said

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Userlevel 4
Badge +5

Hello @Dragan 
I don’t think you can run the command to destroy or stop a cluster from anywhere other than the CVM.
Regarding the Java Applet, it only discover new nodes or nodes which have foundation service running and is used only for foundation imaging purposes.
If you have lost connectivity to host and CVM, you can use the crash cart to physically connect to the node and access the CVM from the node.
 
  
 

Thx Hitesh0801,

problem is I don’t have credentials for CVM or Prism. What’s the approach in that case?

 

Thx,
Dragan

Userlevel 4
Badge +5

Hello @Dragan 

Assuming you have access to the Node physically and the Hypervisor is AHV. 
 

At the end of the day, AHV is still a KVM Based hypervisor. 
Access to the Node using crash kart, boot the AHV host into single-user and change the password. 

A quick search regarding the single-user mode will give you details regarding it and the steps involved. 

Disclaimer: If it’s production environment, proceed with care. 

 

Hitesh0801,

sorry but maybe we have misunderstanding here or i’m not following you:

You said “boot the AHV host into single-user and change the password” - I have AHV password and I have access to hypervisor. You want to say I can chage CVM password from AHV single-user mode?

 

I don’t have CVM or Prism access - is there option to destroy cluster?

 

BR,

Dragan

Userlevel 3
Badge +3

 @Dragan  Assuming you no more care about existing cluster data, you can:

 

1- I have not tried this, but since you have access to the AHV, you should be able to run:

virsh list-all (to get the cvm name and it should show the cvm is not running)

If the cvm does run, try:

visrsh destroy <cvm-name>  (this should stop it)

and finally

virsh undefine <cvm name>

This should remove the configuration file on that node, You should try this on all nodes

2- If the above does not work, for what you need,  run phoenix iso built for your desired AOS, from ipmi and either repair CVM or reinstall CVM (if your intention is to make use of these for another cluster). If that is not your intention, you can use general phoenix iso from your portal and get the disks using the “lssci” command and wipe out the partition tables on each disks using: “dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdX bs=1M count=2048", this  destroys the first 2G of the disk and the partition table will gone.

 

Having said the above, you can actually switch the cvm password to default, using the same phoenix iso as above but mounting the boot drive of the cvm on phoenix shell and modifying the password back to the default value. But this is a very involved process and I suggest you to open a case with support to do so..

 

 

Hope this helps a little;

 

Regards,

 

-Said

Thx Said, this answers all doubts. I will do a research a little bit more on all aspects.

 

BR,

Dragan

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